Funding influences exposure and review of cancer research

June 25, 2013
Funding influences exposure and review of cancer research
Abstracts submitted to the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting by researchers who have financial relationships with commercial interests are more prominently placed and more favorably scored by peers, according to research published online June 17 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

(HealthDay)—Abstracts submitted to the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting by researchers who have financial relationships with commercial interests are more prominently placed and more favorably scored by peers, according to research published online June 17 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Beverly Moy, M.D., M.P.H., of the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center in Boston, and colleagues analyzed 20,718 abstracts presented at ASCO meetings in 2006 and 2008 to 2011. The association of financial conflicts of interest (FCOIs) with meeting placement and peer review score was examined. On a scale of 1 to 5, lower peer-reviewed scores indicated greater scientific merit.

The researchers found that 36 percent of the abstracts had at least one author who reported an FCOI. A significant increase in the proportion of abstracts with any FCOI was observed for 2011 (38 percent) compared with 2006 (33 percent). Compared with general posters, abstracts with FCOIs were significantly more likely to receive placement (in descending order of meeting prominence) in plenary session (odds ratio [OR], 7.3), clinical science symposium (OR, 2.2), oral presentation (OR, 1.9), and poster discussion (OR, 1.7). For all abstracts except publish-only, those with FCOIs had a significantly more favorable mean peer-reviewed score (2.62) compared with those without FCOIs (2.73).

"Real and perceived financial conflicts of interest and risks of bias in the conduct and reporting of research represent important issues that necessitate strategies to safeguard the public," writes the author of an accompanying editorial.

Several study authors and the editorial author disclosed to the biomedical and/or .

Explore further: Conflict-of-interest disclosures common at 2011 AAOS meeting

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Conflict-of-interest disclosures common at 2011 AAOS meeting

March 19, 2013
(HealthDay)—At the 2011 American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) annual meeting, voluntarily disclosed conflicts of interest were common, especially for featured symposia, according to a study published in the March ...

New guidelines for writing abstracts will help authors summarise their research

April 9, 2013
A new extension to the PRISMA guideline on reporting systemic reviews and meta-analyses (types of studies that analyse information from many studies) will help authors to give a more robust summary (abstract) of their study ...

More cutting-edge cancer research supported by industry

May 17, 2012
Nearly half of the research presented at ASCO's annual meeting last year came from researchers with ties to companies, and the amount appears to be increasing every year, according to new findings from Fox Chase Cancer Center. ...

Study reveals that financial conflicts of interest are associated with positive study outcomes

May 27, 2011
Results demonstrate that 91% of RCTs recording this kind of FCOI achieved a positive - outcome, compared to 66.7% of RCTs without specific FCOI (p=0.02) and adjusting for confounding factors did not change this finding.

ASCO: Cancer patients want to talk about costs with docs

May 31, 2013
(HealthDay)—Although financial distress is common, even in insured patients, discussion of costs of cancer care with doctors rarely happens, according to research to be presented at the annual meeting of the American Society ...

Recommended for you

Single blood test screens for eight cancer types

January 18, 2018
Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers developed a single blood test that screens for eight common cancer types and helps identify the location of the cancer.

The pill lowers ovarian cancer risk, even for smokers

January 18, 2018
(HealthDay)—It's known that use of the birth control pill is tied to lower odds for ovarian cancer, but new research shows the benefit extends to smokers or women who are obese.

Researchers find a way to 'starve' cancer

January 18, 2018
Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) have demonstrated for the first time that it is possible to starve a tumor and stop its growth with a newly discovered small compound that blocks uptake of the vital ...

These foods may up your odds for colon cancer

January 18, 2018
(HealthDay)—Chowing down on red meat, white bread and sugar-laden drinks might increase your long-term risk of colon cancer, a new study suggests.

How cancer metastasis happens: Researchers reveal a key mechanism

January 18, 2018
Cancer metastasis, the migration of cells from a primary tumor to form distant tumors in the body, can be triggered by a chronic leakage of DNA within tumor cells, according to a team led by Weill Cornell Medicine and Memorial ...

Modular gene enhancer promotes leukemia and regulates effectiveness of chemotherapy

January 18, 2018
Every day, billions of new blood cells are generated in the bone marrow. The gene Myc is known to play an important role in this process, and is also known to play a role in cancer. Scientists from the German Cancer Research ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.