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Sports medicine & Kinesiology news

Cardiology

Athletes warned against potential dangers of natural supplements

Nutritional supplements taken to boost athletic performance can pose risks to the heart, according to a European Society of Cardiology (ESC) statement published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal ...

Neuroscience

Concussion management is changing as more research suggests exercise is best approach

Public interest in concussion has exploded over the space of a generation, together with a new understanding of how best to help patients recover. Concussion patients were once prescribed rest in a dark room, but in recent ...

Health

Mayo Clinic Minute: Exercising in the new year

Keeping to a New Year's resolution is so difficult for some that there's even a day on the calendar for those unsuccessful to abandon their plans: Jan. 17, which is known as "Ditch New Year's Resolution Day." But before all ...

Sports medicine & Kinesiology

Research uncovers previously unknown aspects of running shoe design

A University at Buffalo researcher has some good news for athletes and fitness enthusiasts who favor thick, heavily cushioned running shoes. Although these shoes are increasingly popular because they provide comfort and a ...

Sports medicine & Kinesiology

Farther or faster? Both improve distance running performance

A study performed at the University of Jyväskylä compared two-week blocks of low-intensity training and high-intensity interval training in terms of performance and recovery. Both methods can improve endurance performance ...

Pediatrics

Light, flexible school shoes the best option for kids

They may not be the hardiest, but children's school shoes that allow more natural movement are the best choice, positively impacting children's foot strength, muscle structure and balance as they grow according to new research ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Getting back to sports after recovering from COVID-19

(HealthDay)—Folks who've had a tough case of COVID-19 shouldn't hit the gym for basketball or an aerobics class without getting checked out by their doctor first, according to the American College for Sports Medicine.

Sports medicine & Kinesiology

Scientists unveil the enigma of the vulnerability of Achilles tendon

In the human body, there is a soft spot—the Achilles tendon. As its name suggests, the Achilles tendon is one of the most powerful and fragile tendons in the body. The Achilles tendon can endure a load close to 8 times ...

Pediatrics

When is the right time for children to learn to swim?

Each year in Australia, an average of 23 children under five die from unintentional drowning, usually due to factors such as a lack of adult supervision, unrestricted access to water and not having the skills to stay safe ...

Neuroscience

Could concussion be monitored through urine samples?

Concussion can be frustratingly hard to diagnose and track. The injury doesn't show up on routine brain scans, and there is no definitive diagnostic test. It's usually diagnosed based on symptoms, and, in athletes, comparison ...

Sports medicine & Kinesiology

Artificial intelligence aids effective fitness training

Whether for squats or sit-ups, the software created by the start-up VAY alerts exercisers about incorrect movements via a smartphone screen. Now the ETH spin-off has been acquired by connected fitness equipment manufacturer ...

Sports medicine & Kinesiology

Weightlifting: How beginners can get started this new year

Weightlifting has become increasingly popular with people looking to get in shape. Not only can it be a great way to lose weight, it can also build strength and prevent muscle loss as we age.

Health

Aching feet: How to choose home footwear wisely

When the COVID-19 pandemic started and many of us began spending more time at home, attire inevitably became more casual—except maybe for a Zoom-acceptable dress shirt. We've gotten used to that by now, but Sean Peden, ...

Arthritis & Rheumatism

How we walk could impact future arthritis

A new study suggests a person's walking style that places more pressure on the hips and knees can contribute to future osteoarthritis. Researchers say the key is to find and catch these habits 'in the act' early on.

Neuroscience

NFL players face 4 times the odds of ALS

NFL players are four times more likely to die of Lou Gehrig's disease (ALS) than other people, new research finds, adding to known links between football-related head injuries and brain diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's ...

Sports medicine & Kinesiology

Study advances knowledge of what happens in our cells after exercise

An international team of researchers has developed a new approach to pinpoint which proteins in our cells are most critical for increasing sugar absorption after exercise—an important benefit of exercise that can help maintain ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Study: Regular exercise reduces the risk of and death from pneumonia

People who exercise regularly can reduce their risk of developing and dying from pneumonia, new research has found. The study, led by the University of Bristol and published in GeroScience, analyzed, for the first time, ten ...